Thursday, July 29, 2010

1-800-WHATS-THE-NUMBER

For decades and decades, businesses have advertised their phone numbers with names.

1-800-CALL-ATT

1-877-KARS-4-KIDS 
(with the catchy little jingle I hear on the radio)

1-800-PET-MEDS 

1-800-CALL-ADT

and on the back of my check card
1-800-NASAFCU

Just the other day I was helping Peggy take care of some bills left over from her old house, and we needed to get a hold of Verizon. I picked up the house phone and started to dial. She laughed, 'What are you doing?' 'I'm dialing 1-800-Verizon of course'. She thought I was joking. Nope, ding ding, you have reach Verizon how can we direct your call (so that you will never actually talk to someone?). Sometimes the easiest solution is the solution.

The kicker is, if they don't also spell out the actual number, you can only dial it on a land line phone (I know, so 1990's right?). Because, unless you have a photographic memory, the letters don't correspond at all on your cell phone. I'm looking at two separate cell phones right now, and the letter 'G' is the #5 on one phone, and doesn't even match up with a number at all on the other. What I'm wondering is if anyone noticed besides me.

I know some will say it's a moot point, because if you are dialing from your cell phone you don't need to worry about long distance vs. local number, because it doesn't cost anymore. And I like talking on my land line phone to people for bills stuff, cause you know you are going to be on there forever so holding up the little phone isn't going to cut it really.

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On another phone note, my less than 2 year old son is a fan of iCarly. He tried to call her on his phone the other day. :-P